Do not include any child that receives a benefit in their own name, such as Income Support, income-based Jobseeker's Allowance, income-related Employment & Support Allowance or Universal Credit. Do not include any child that is in care or that the local authority is paying you an allowance to look after, for example, a fostering allowance. You do not qualify for child related benefits for these children.
Accounting is the measurement, processing and communication of financial information about economic entities[15][16] such as businesses and corporations. The modern field was established by the Italian mathematician Luca Pacioli in 1494.[17] Accounting, which has been called the "language of business",[18] measures the results of an organization's economic activities and conveys this information to a variety of users, including investors, creditors, management, and regulators.[19] Practitioners of accounting are known as accountants. The terms "accounting" and "financial reporting" are often used as synonyms.
A company limited by shares: The most common form of the company used for business ventures. Specifically, a limited company is a "company in which the liability of each shareholder is limited to the amount individually invested" with corporations being "the most common example of a limited company."[11] This type of company is common in England and many English-speaking countries. A company limited by shares may be a
"Going public" through a process known as an initial public offering (IPO) means that part of the business will be owned by members of the public. This requires the organization as a distinct entity, to disclose information to the public, and adhering to a tighter set of laws and procedures. Most public entities are corporations that have sold shares, but increasingly there are also public LLC's that sell units (sometimes also called shares), and other more exotic entities as well, such as, for example, real estate investment trusts in the USA, and unit trusts in the UK. A general partnership cannot "go public".
"Going public" through a process known as an initial public offering (IPO) means that part of the business will be owned by members of the public. This requires the organization as a distinct entity, to disclose information to the public, and adhering to a tighter set of laws and procedures. Most public entities are corporations that have sold shares, but increasingly there are also public LLC's that sell units (sometimes also called shares), and other more exotic entities as well, such as, for example, real estate investment trusts in the USA, and unit trusts in the UK. A general partnership cannot "go public".
Generally, corporations are required to pay tax just like "real" people. In some tax systems, this can give rise to so-called double taxation, because first the corporation pays tax on the profit, and then when the corporation distributes its profits to its owners, individuals have to include dividends in their income when they complete their personal tax returns, at which point a second layer of income tax is imposed.

A very detailed and well-established body of rules that evolved over a very long period of time applies to commercial transactions. The need to regulate trade and commerce and resolve business disputes helped shape the creation of law and courts. The Code of Hammurabi dates back to about 1772 BC for example, and contains provisions that relate, among other matters, to shipping costs and dealings between merchants and brokers.[27] The word "corporation" derives from the Latin corpus, meaning body, and the Maurya Empire in Iron-Age India accorded legal rights to business entities.[28]
The size and scope of the business firm and its structure, management, and ownership, broadly analyzed in the theory of the firm. Generally, a smaller business is more flexible, while larger businesses, or those with wider ownership or more formal structures, will usually tend to be organized as corporations or (less often) partnerships. In addition, a business that wishes to raise money on a stock market or to be owned by a wide range of people will often be required to adopt a specific legal form to do so.
A company limited by guarantee: Commonly used where companies are formed for noncommercial purposes, such as clubs or charities. The members guarantee the payment of certain (usually nominal) amounts if the company goes into insolvent liquidation, but otherwise, they have no economic rights in relation to the company. This type of company is common in England. A company limited by guarantee may be with or without having share capital.
If you receive a Fostering Allowance please don’t include this as income on the Income for Benefits screen as it is ignored when calculating your entitlement to benefits. On the Income for Tax Credits screen, only include the amount of your Fostering Allowance that is taxable. You can read about how much of your Fostering Allowance is taxable on the Foster Carers page of the gov.uk website.
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