"Going public" through a process known as an initial public offering (IPO) means that part of the business will be owned by members of the public. This requires the organization as a distinct entity, to disclose information to the public, and adhering to a tighter set of laws and procedures. Most public entities are corporations that have sold shares, but increasingly there are also public LLC's that sell units (sometimes also called shares), and other more exotic entities as well, such as, for example, real estate investment trusts in the USA, and unit trusts in the UK. A general partnership cannot "go public".
The Benefits Calculator does not currently calculate benefit entitlement for students, although we are aiming for this to be included in the future. This is because special rules apply and the results provided will not be accurate if you continue with the calculation. This includes students who are full time or part time, or in further, higher, advanced or non advanced education.
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