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If you are a care leaver and you are aged over 18 and under 22, you may be exempt from the rules that stop some 18-21 year olds getting the Housing Element of Universal Credit to help pay for their rent. If you are a care leaver living in private rented accommodation, your Housing Benefit (or Housing Element of Universal Credit) may be based on you needing one bedroom in a self-contained property. If you think you qualify, you should click ‘yes’.
One measure we take to enforce this rule is to compare EI information with information from the Canada Border Services Agency. If we find you have been out of the country while collecting benefits, we will determine whether you were entitled to receive those benefits. If you were not entitled to receive them, we will calculate how much we overpaid you, and you will then have to repay the benefits.
Some specialized businesses may also require licenses, either due to laws governing entry into certain trades, occupations or professions, that require special education or to raise revenue for local governments. Professions that require special licenses include law, medicine, piloting aircraft, selling liquor, radio broadcasting, selling investment securities, selling used cars, and roofing. Local jurisdictions may also require special licenses and taxes just to operate a business.
Limited liability companies (LLC), limited liability partnerships, and other specific types of business organization protect their owners or shareholders from business failure by doing business under a separate legal entity with certain legal protections. In contrast, unincorporated businesses or persons working on their own are usually not as protected.[7][8]
"Going public" through a process known as an initial public offering (IPO) means that part of the business will be owned by members of the public. This requires the organization as a distinct entity, to disclose information to the public, and adhering to a tighter set of laws and procedures. Most public entities are corporations that have sold shares, but increasingly there are also public LLC's that sell units (sometimes also called shares), and other more exotic entities as well, such as, for example, real estate investment trusts in the USA, and unit trusts in the UK. A general partnership cannot "go public".
Do not include any child that receives a benefit in their own name, such as Income Support, income-based Jobseeker's Allowance, income-related Employment & Support Allowance or Universal Credit. Do not include any child that is in care or that the local authority is paying you an allowance to look after, for example, a fostering allowance. You do not qualify for child related benefits for these children.
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